Sound Proof Playroom!

So... you like the house and the neighborhood, but the family has grown to the point where more room is needed, and there is no option of constructing an addition. What do you do? This was the challenge faced in this renovation project. The answer was to construct two new rooms on the second floor, by adding a new ceiling/floor system in two first floor rooms, both of which had tall two story cathedral ceilings. Photo7

        An engineer specified the structures, making sure that the footing had adequate support present in the crawlspace to handle the additional weight. Another goal was to minimize the sound transfer from the new second floor play room space to the existing family areas below.

1       We used metal RC 1 resilient sound deadening channels to hang ⅝ “ drywall for the ceilings below, and installed heavy duty carpet padding under the new carpet floor areas. The result was added square footage providing a new office area and laundry, and a significantly sound deadened playroom for the kids.

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Whole House Renovation, Energy Upgrade, and Addition

       This project was developed in two stages. First, an entire renovation to the existing house built in 1953. We refurbished old rooms, dealt with lead based paint issues, and improved energy efficiency. Doors and windows were replaced, in addition to an old electric water heater that was switched to a Rinnai 735 gpm tankless gas model.

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The original house had a flat uninsulated 2x6 ceiling/roof structure. The decorative plaster ceilings were in great condition, and were not in need of removal. Insulation was necessary, so we built up the roof with rigid foam boards, typically used on commercial roofs. They were covered with two inches of closed cell spray foam. By applying an acrylic sealant over the foam insulation, it provided a strong, walkable, roof surface in addition to a superior R-Value.

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         The energy upgrade was topped off by converting the vented crawlspace into a semi-conditioned sealed crawlspace. The kitchen was also renovated to include more energy efficient appliances.

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        In the second phase, an unused septic tank was removed, making way for an adjacent addition which would consist of a Master Bedroom suite, office, and center screened porch area. The owners and architect developed a unique modernist design for the addition, including a fiber cement exterior, resembling a concrete structure by using panels seamed together.

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Also, a continuation of the flat roof, as well as the installation of a parapet with a scupper & leader drainage system. The addition maintained energy efficiency via closed cell spray foam roofing and open cell spray foam wall insulation, a sealed crawl space, energy efficient windows, and a low energy zoned heat pump system.

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